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Having A 3D TV Is A Lonely Prospect

by Sean P. Aune | June 11, 2010June 11, 2010 4:02 pm PDT

Right now the FIFA World Cup is happening in South Africa. While this is a momentous time that comes around every four years for soccer (football to anyone outside of the United States), something else historic is happening: The first sporting event transmitted in 3D.

The opening game of the 2010 World Cup between South Africa and Mexico is the very first sporting event being transmitted in 3D by ESPN.  Over the course of the month long tournament a total of 25 games will be shown in 3D and then … a whole lot of nothing.  ESPN’s new 3D service will only transmit a handful of product through out this year, and when there is nothing new to be shown, the channel will be dark.  The company sees no need to transmit repeats at this early stage in the venture, and that means you’ve just spent a whole lot of money on something with very few uses for right now.

espn 3dWhile there are now 3D Blu-ray players, and a few 3D Playstation 3 games, there just isn’t that much content to go along with all of your new equipment. There is supposed to be another TV channel coming some time this year, but we haven’t heard a firm launch date on that as of yet.  Until that time, what are you going to do with those expensive glasses and TV set you have sitting around?  Sure, you can watch HD content on it, but that isn’t why you bought it.

The problem is that with the early HD TVs, there was a reason for all the various channels to upgrade as it meant a better picture, and that was a no-brainer situation.  The problem with 3D is that not everyone is sold on the concept as of yet.  Do we really need this in our lives?  Is it worth the expense to broadcasters to go ahead and upgrade?  It’s a Catch-22 situation as broadcasters won’t upgrade if there are no customers, and customers won’t upgrade if there is no content.

So, if you’be bought a 3D set already, and you are hopefully tuning into the World Cup games, let us know how they looked.  We want to hear what you thought, how you felt and if it was worth all of the hassle to be such a pioneer.


Sean P. Aune

Sean P. Aune has been a professional technology blogger since July 2007, but his love of tech dates back to at least 1976 when his parents bought...

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