The smartwatch everyone has been waiting for didn’t have much of a presence at Google I/O this week. It made a few quick cameo appearances on some executive wrists. But aside from that, the wearable didn’t get much airtime on Wednesday—and it’s probably because the device isn’t quite ready for consumer release. We’ll soon be able to get our hands-on the G Watch and Gear Live, but unfortunately the Moto 360’s release is a little more nebulous. “Coming this summer,” is what Google said.

Thankfully we were able to track down a unit at I/O and get some hands-on time with the more traditional timepiece. As expected, this is the smartwatch to look out for this year. Obviously the 360 is taking a more classic approach in terms of design. Compared to the squared off watch faces we’ve seen over the past few years, the 360 features a rounded face that looks absolutely incredible; the screen almost doesn’t look real. It’s such a strange thing to see a watch as beautiful as this sport a digital screen.

We’re happy to report that the Moto 360 doesn’t feel nearly as big as it looks, which is great for anyone with any lingering concerns. It definitely is big, but not so big where it engulfs your wrist. The Moto 360 is light as well, and very comfortable, adding to the illusion that it’s smaller than it actually is. But the device’s design is only half of the story, because the Moto 360 works tremendously well, too. We’re now more excited than we’ve ever been to jump headfirst into the imminent Android Wear future.

The bad part is we still don’t know exactly when we’ll be able to purchase a Moto 360, which is a darn shame because it looks to be the pick of Google’s Android Wear litter. The design is excellent, the screen is beautiful and responsive, and the underlying software seems to tie everything together perfectly. As excited as we are for the G watch and Gear Live, the Moto 360 is definitely the wearable to watch out for this year.

As soon as we know a price and date we’ll be sure to let you know. For now, check out our brief hands-on, and stay tuned for more Google I/O coverage.