You know Aaron Sorkin’s work on The Social Network and The West Wing (among others), but his legacy might be defined by the upcoming Jobs biopic, which is set to begin filming sometime next year. The writer recently sat down with Bloomberg to discuss the upcoming movie, and the challenges of writing about such a polarizing personality.

“I think that you could do ten more movies about Steve Jobs, and I think if you lined up ten writers and said “write a movie about Steve Jobs,” you’d get ten different movies, all of them worth going to see,” Sorkin told Bloomberg’s Emily Chang.

It was revealed very early on that the new Jobs film, which still doesn’t officially have a cast, would focus on three major Apple product launches; David Fincher was originally attached to direct, though he has since dropped out. Meanwhile, Christian Bale has repeatedly been tapped to star, though new reports claim the actor wound up pulling out for undisclosed reasons.

During his second stint at Apple, Jobs helped mold the company into what it is today, introducing market-defining products such as the iPod, iPhone and iPad. He’s a figure that many people worship, which in and of itself poses a challenge. In the interview, Sorkin recognizes the challenges of tackling the legend of Jobs, saying there’s more pressure than usual because he was so loved.

“The same pressure that I feel when I’m writing anything… maybe with a little bit of sauce on top of pressure because he is a person that so many people have so many strong feelings about,” Sorkin said.

Sorkin reveals that he had the pleasure of speaking to Jobs on three different occasions, and actually helped with the Apple co-founder’s famous Stanford 2005 commencement speech. In addition, Sorkin says he has met extensively with some of the film’s real-life counterparts, including Steve Wozniak, former Apple CEO John Sculley and Joanna Hoffman, who once served as Apple’s Mac marketing chief.

The clip above is just a small snippet of Sorkin’s interview, which is set to air tonight on Bloomberg’s Studio 1.0

Source Bloomberg