jony-ive

Following a more extensive piece on Tim Cook by The New York Times over the weekend, a shorter interview with Jony Ive was published on Monday, featuring a discussion on design, focus and what it’s like working with Apple’s current CEO.

As one of Apple’s more well-liked executives, Ive has taken on a more prominent role following the high profile departure of Scott Forstall, bringing a more minimalist approach to Apple’s hardware and software. We’ve seen his handiwork with iOS 7, and more recently with OS X Yosemite, which more closely mirrors the “flat” looks of Apple’s mobile software. But that’s only a short glimpse at what’s to come, it seems, with Ive saying his process of design is “incredibly vibrant and healthy and continues to grow and evolve.”

On the changes made to software, Ive said what’s most important is to focus on the product, which is something imparted to him by the late Steve Jobs.

I wish I could do a better job in communicating this truth here, which is when you really are focused on the product, that’s not a platitude. When that truly is your reason for coming into the studio, is just to try to make the very best product you can, when that is exclusive of everything else, it’s remarkable how insignificant or unimportant a lot of other stuff becomes.

Ive also talks about how Apple copes with the pressure to come out with the next “iThing,” as NYT puts it. He admits being patient is difficult—“It was hard for Steve. It is hard for Tim.”—but he said what separates Apple and The Others is the company’s level of focus. However, despite that pressure, it sounds like Ive is confident of what’s to come, as are many of Apple’s other executives.

When talking about how Ive continues to move Apple’s hardware in new directions, he mentioned materials the company has never worked with before.

“I would love to talk about future stuff—they’re materials we haven’t worked in before,” Ive said. “I’ve been working on this stuff for a few years now. Tim is fundamentally involved in pushing into these new areas and into these materials.”

Source NYTimes