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GoPro officially filed a form S-1 with the Securities and Exchange Commission on Monday, signifying its intentions to move from a private company to a public one, in which shares will be available for purchase on a U.S. stock exchange. This isn’t the first time we’ve heard about the company’s intentions to go public, however.

Back in February we learned that GoPro had filed for a confidential IPO, a form of initial public offering in which a company can submit the required paperwork for an IPO without having to disclose how much money it’s making publicly. Confidential IPOs are typically reserved for companies that generate less than $1 billion in revenue per year. Now, however, with the paperwork out in the open, we can learn a bit more about GoPro’s financial position.

In the S-1 filing, GoPro reveals that it has seen huge increases in revenue each first quarter since 2011. In the three-month period ended March 31, 2014, GoPro recorded $235.7 million in revenue. While that was down from the $255 million it generated in the year-ago quarter, the company’s revenue costs decreased, allowing for increased profitability. Speaking of profitability, GoPro generated $122.5 million in profits in 2011, $227.4 million in profits in 2012, and $361.2 million in profits in 2013.

Here, take a look at the juicy balance sheet figures that show revenue, cost of revenue and gross profits:

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Despite those healthy growth figures, GoPro doesn’t expect it will continue to grow as rapidly. “We do not expect to continue to grow in the future at the same rate we have in the past and profitability in recent periods might not be indicative of future performance,” the firm said in its S-1 filing.

GoPro cameras still seem to be super popular among consumers, and use cases have only increased with the introduction of hobby drones, which often have cameras attached, and the increased popularity of video sharing sites. We don’t know when the company’s official IPO will take place just yet, but we’ll keep you in the loop as we hear more.

Source SEC