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Numerous reports have suggested Apple will release two iPhones later this year: a standard upgrade with a 4.7-inch display, and one with a 5.5-inch screen to compete in the phablet space. The consensus seems to be Apple is serious about catering to the latest big phone trends. But according to UBS analyst Steve Milunovich, Apple’s phablet may not be announced alongside the 4.7-inch iteration later this year. Milunovich cited the ever-vague “supply chain checks” for his report.

For months reports have circulatied claiming Apple is considering two different sizes for its next big upgrade cycle, with 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch being the most talked about. But apparently Milunovich’s latest supply checks were less than satisfactory, leading him to believe that Apple “may or may not” launch its phablet iPhone as the 4.7-inch version. It’s unclear in what area the constraints are affecting Apple’s rumored phablet, but the problems are severe enough to warrant a “delay.”

Milunovich said in his research note that Apple will unveil its next iPhone in August or September, not in June, claiming a 4.7-inch “seems certain.” Meanwhile, Milunovich noted that the 4.7-inch and 5.5-inch iPhones will sport the same screen resolution, making it easier for app developers. A previous rumor claimed Apple would boost the resolution of its iPhone and begin using the marketing term “Ultra-Retina Screen.”

Analyst reports typically seem based on rumors circulating around the Internet, so interpret Milunovich’s note how you want. A 4.7-inch iPhone without compromising on the current size seems like a plausible design choice for Apple. But jumping all the way up to 5.5 inches seems a little more far fetched. Even if reports claim the Cupertino company is toying with the idea, that doesn’t mean we’ll actually see Apple go through with it.

As summer gets closer, the Apple rumors will continue to heat up. The company has again been quiet despite promising a big 2014. WWDC typically takes place in June, but will there be anything before then? That remains to be seen.

Source Barrons