Vine, Twitter’s new micro-vid sharing service, has become a force to be reckoned with. Thursday, its first and only mobile app debuted in the iOS App Store, and since then, it has been highly publicized in the geek blogging space as well as to the general public, thanks to Apple making it an Editor’s Choice. The dead-simple, fun and totally addicting app has become a break-out hit with the public, even spawned a dedicated website for lurkers, and has created a mountain of six-second videos for all the world to see. And what they’re seeing is porn. Lots of it. In fact, some of it was even featured by the company itself. 

A collective jaw drop occurred today, when Vine users fired up the mobile app and saw some hard-core action featured in the Editor’s Picks section. Turns out, Twitter didn’t mean to put it there and raced to pull the clip. It was human error, said the micro-blogging company, apologizing for the gaffe.

That featured video isn’t the only X-rated clip hanging off the Vine, though. And maybe Twitter can’t clear it all out, but it can make the search for them more difficult. The company is blocking commonly used hashtags for pornographic content, like #porn, #sex, #booty and other even more explicit terms. No results come up when using any of those, though less common ones (like #pornvine or #nsfw) do deliver some results. Twitter also has a feedback system that relies on users flagging inappropriate material, and those flagged entries get a warning slapped on them that users have to still through to see the content. 

This is not the last you’ll hear of this episode, particularly when Apple gets involved. In the App Store, the Vine app is rated 12+, which is extremely likely to change… that is, if Apple even allows the app to stay in the store. Cupertino is incredibly touchy when it comes to racy material, often heavily warning or even blocking apps that could potentially evoke adult material. You could even say the company’s hyper-sensitive about it — the App Store has even slapped warnings on third-party browsers, which — of course — offers access to all types of websites. (Isn’t that the point of web browsers?) So far, Apple has ceased promoting the Twitter-owned service altogether, yanking it from the store’s featured sections, but the app still remains available (as of this writing).  

In the mean time, if you’re sensitive about this type of material or concerned about kids using the app, you’ll want to take note of this. And if it prompts you to snag the Vine app yourself, well…you may want to download it before Apple pulls the plug.

 

Brandon Russell contributed to this report.