Ever consider just how many of your treasured photos are on Facebook or Flickr? Lucky for you, Seagate has. The company has introduced a new slew of backup drives, called Backup Plus, that can stash those cloud-based images for you. (Of course, that’s not the only type of data it can house, but it’s by far the most intriguing.)

As with other solutions, it can perform standard backups — like straight from your home computer to the drive — or be set up with scheduling for specific times in just a few clicks. For backing up social media data, users just have to provide their Facebook and Flickr logins, grant access permission, and the software handles the rest.

Seagate certainly knows its target customer here, as the product was basically designed to be idiot-proof (likely to appeal to non-techie social media fanatics, like Aunt Fanny or Uncle Morty). The most appealing part for them will be the Auto-Save feature — once Backup Plus is set up, it will download and backup those pics automatically and instantly without the need for any further user intervention. Note, however, that the initial backup could be epic, depending on the user. (Would be handy if it could check for duplicates locally before downloading. Alas, that’s not the case.) After that, though, it should be pretty speedy, as it only syncs the new stuff.

This is a good idea, just ask anyone who’s had their accounts shut down for any reason or ever lost important images to server farm meltdowns. What would make it great, though, would be cheaper prices. While not out of reach — at $120 / 500 gigs, $130 / 750 gigs, and $140 / a terabyte — it could be just enough to discourage some from safeguarding their social pics. But at least for the money, the drives are attractive, lightweight, can be used as normal backup drives, and come with swappable USM ports (which makes it stupid simple to future-proof the product with USB 3.0, FireWire, Thunderbolt connections and whatever else is coming down the pike).

Would you use a backup device for your social media images, or know anyone who could? If so, hit up the company at the source link for more info.

[via DVICE, source Seagate]