Sources are saying that Android 2.4 will release in April, but retain the Gingerbread name to cover a mistake in the releases.

According to Pocket-Lint, Viewsonic informed them exclusively that its ViewPad 4 will launch with Android 2.4 in April, and that this new version will not be codenamed Ice Cream as first suspected, but instead will retain the Android 2.3 Gingerbread name instead.  The reason for this is that 2.3 is incapable of running dual-core enabled apps on a single core, but 2.4 will fix this issue.  It is presumed that the Gingerbread name is being retained for what amounts to an incremental release because the dual-core support is the only new feature that will be added.

All of this is a direct result of Android 3.0 Honeycomb, the new tablet version of the OS, adding dual-core support.  This could have led to a further fracturing of the Android developer landscape as they would have been developing apps only for Honeycomb, while leaving Gingerbread very lonely and unloved for a newly released mobile version.

This move raises some serious questions about about Android in general.  Why couldn’t this have minor update just been called 2.3.1 instead of going all the way to 2.4?  Does this mean that Android Ice Cream now becomes 2.5?  At what point will the mobile and tablet versions fully converge?  Will John ever discover that it’s his baby that Lucy is actually carrying? … okay, wait, I think I got off track there for a minute.

As it stands, the only phone announced that will be carrying the 2.3 Gingerbread version is the Samsung Galaxy S, but now we have to wonder if that won’t be delayed in anticipation of 2.4 Gingerbread.

All we know is, the marketplace is about to get very confused when it comes to Android.  When you add in the fact that Android 2.2 and below are incapable of running dual-core apps on a single-core, there are going to also be a lot of very frustrated customers.  The fracturing of the Android landscape appears to be about to get a whole lot worse.

What say you?  Is this the right move on the part of Google?

[via Pocket-Lint]